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The Platyrrhine Fossil Record

  • 1st Edition - January 28, 1990
  • Editors: John G. Fleagle, Alfred L. Rosenberger
  • Language: English
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 2 - 6 7 0 7 - 4

The Platyrrhine Fossil Record is a compendium of papers presented in a symposium of the 12th Congress of the International Congress of Primatology held in Brazil. One paper reviews… Read more

The Platyrrhine Fossil Record

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The Platyrrhine Fossil Record is a compendium of papers presented in a symposium of the 12th Congress of the International Congress of Primatology held in Brazil. One paper reviews evidence from fossil platyrrhines where the author concludes new dating and environmental data where these animals lived. Another paper describes the major changes pertaining to South American mammalian fauna during the Cenozoic Era, which he relates to global and regional geotectonic changes. Other papers review the paleontology and geology of the Miocene Pintura Formation and reassess the morphological transformations traditionally assumed as having been involved in platyrrhine phylogeny. One author also proposes that a prosimian-like ancestor is probably the predecessors of anthropoids; any similarities and primitive mammals can be evolutionary reversals associated with quadrupedal movements. The text also addresses the issue whether anthropoids, including platyrrhines, evolved from a prosimian ancestor or prosimians are just a group with mammalian postcranial skeletal structure. One author also reviews fossil remains found in the Caribbean, citing seven endemic taxa of platyrrhines in Cuba, Hispaniola, and Jamaica. Anthropologists, researchers involved in anatomical sciences, academicians, and administrators whose works are connected with museums of natural history or institutes of primate research will find this collection valuable.