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The Plasma Proteins

Isolation, Characterization, and Function

  • 1st Edition - January 1, 1960
  • Editor: Frank W Putnam
  • Language: English
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 2 - 5 8 6 7 - 6

The Plasma Proteins, Volume I: Isolation, Characterization, and Function focuses on the reactions, properties, characteristics, and transformations of plasma proteins. The… Read more

The Plasma Proteins

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The Plasma Proteins, Volume I: Isolation, Characterization, and Function focuses on the reactions, properties, characteristics, and transformations of plasma proteins. The selection first offers information on the fractionation and isolation of purified components by precipitation methods and electrophoretic and ultracentrifugal analysis of normal human serum. Discussions focus on correlation of electrophoretic and ultracentrifugal results, electrophoretic analytical methodology and results, parameters influencing protein solubility, and techniques for the separation of proteins by precipitation methods. The text then ponders on the chromatography of plasma proteins and chemical composition and molecular parameters of purified plasma proteins. The manuscript elaborates on plasma albumin and macroglobulins and high molecular weight antibodies. Topics include immunological properties, physical and chemical properties of normal and pathological macroglobulins, purity, homogeneity, and variability, denaturation behavior, and sulfhydryl groups, mercaptalbumin, and the mercury dimer. The book then examines glycoproteins and metal-binding plasma proteins and cation transport. The selection is a highly recommended reference for biochemists and clinicians interested in plasma proteins.