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The Dynamic Loss of Earth's Radiation Belts

From Loss in the Magnetosphere to Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere

1st Edition - September 5, 2019

Editors: Allison Jaynes, Maria Usanova

Language: English
Paperback ISBN:
9 7 8 - 0 - 1 2 - 8 1 3 3 7 1 - 2
eBook ISBN:
9 7 8 - 0 - 1 2 - 8 1 3 3 9 9 - 6

The Dynamic Loss of Earth's Radiation Belts: From Loss in the Magnetosphere to Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere presents a timely review of data from various explorati… Read more

The Dynamic Loss of Earth's Radiation Belts

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The Dynamic Loss of Earth's Radiation Belts: From Loss in the Magnetosphere to Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere presents a timely review of data from various explorative missions, including the Van Allen Probes, the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (which aims to determine magnetopause losses), the completion of four BARREL balloon campaigns, and several CubeSat missions focusing on precipitation losses. This is the first book in the area to include a focus on loss, and not just acceleration and radial transport.

Bringing together two communities, the book includes contributions from experts with knowledge in both precipitation mechanisms and the effects on the atmosphere. There is a direct link between what gets lost in the magnetospheric radiation environment and the energy deposited in the layers of our atmosphere. Very recently, NASA’s Living With a Star program identified a new, targeted research topic that addresses this question, highlighting the timeliness of this precise science. The Dynamic Loss of Earth's Radiation Belts brings together scientists from the space and atmospheric science communities to examine both the causes and effects of particle loss in the magnetosphere.