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Spectroscopy and Photochemistry of Uranyl Compounds

International Series of Monographs on Nuclear Energy

1st Edition - January 1, 1964

Authors: Eugene Rabinowitch, R. Linn Belford

Editor: J. V. Dunworth

Language: English
eBook ISBN:
9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 1 - 5 6 7 5 - 0

Spectroscopy and Photochemistry of Uranyl Compounds is a guide to the research and physics of the actinide elements, particularly the uranyl ion. The book is introduced with the… Read more

Spectroscopy and Photochemistry of Uranyl Compounds

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Spectroscopy and Photochemistry of Uranyl Compounds is a guide to the research and physics of the actinide elements, particularly the uranyl ion. The book is introduced with the subject of the spectroscopy of uranyl salts in the solid state. Studies dealing with the fluorescence and absorption spectra of solid uranyl salts through band measurements and empirical classification, term analysis, and fluorescence spectrum in relation to excitation by light of various wavelengths are then discussed. The book also mentions the analysis of the uranyl spectrum by Dieke and co-workers, because of the precise measurements of the fluorescence and absorption bands obtained under the Manhattan project. The table determined by Pant and Sakhwalkar in their study of the florescence spectrum of solid, hydrated uranyl fluoride at -185 degrees centigrade is presented. The text also discusses the theory of electronic structure and spectra of the uranyl ion. The spectroscopy of uranyl compounds in solution and the uranyl fluorescence intensity and decay are then presented. The book then explains the process of measuring the intensity of slowly decaying florescence of uranyl salts. The primary photochemical reactions in uranyl compounds are found to be slow, giving rise to many secondary thermal reactions that may be unwanted. Researchers in the fields of chemistry and physics working on actinide elements will find this collection of monographs invaluable.