Skip to main content

Save up to 20% on Elsevier print and eBooks with free shipping. No promo code needed.

Save up to 20% on print and eBooks.

Progress in Theoretical Biology

Volume 1

1st Edition - January 1, 1967

Editor: Fred M. Snell

Language: English
eBook ISBN:
9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 2 - 2 4 9 7 - 8

Progress in Theoretical Biology, Volume 1 brings together the significant and timely theoretical developments in particular areas of biology. Topics range from chemical evolution… Read more

Progress in Theoretical Biology

Purchase options

LIMITED OFFER

Save 50% on book bundles

Immediately download your ebook while waiting for your print delivery. No promo code is needed.

Institutional subscription on ScienceDirect

Request a sales quote
Progress in Theoretical Biology, Volume 1 brings together the significant and timely theoretical developments in particular areas of biology. Topics range from chemical evolution and biological self-replicating systems to quantitative aspects of goal-seeking self-organizing systems. An essay on Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961) and his work on genetics and quantum mechanics, as well as its influence on molecular biology, is also included. Comprised of five chapters, this volume first discusses chemical evolution in terms of organic geochemistry and prebiotic chemistry. Dehydration condensation reactions as well as the generation of order and new information are also considered. The next chapter deals with biological self-replicating systems and focuses on such topics as the minimum system capable of self-replication; the minimum system capable of self-replication in terms of the generalizations of terrestrial biology; and which biological systems most nearly approach this limiting behavior. A series of definitions that provide a framework for examining minimal reproducing systems are also presented. The final three chapters explore the quantitative aspects of goal-seeking self-organizing systems; statistical thermodynamics of polymerization and polymorphism of proteins; and the importance of models in theoretical biology. This book is intended for both biological and physical scientists.