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Physical Principles and Techniques of Protein Chemistry Part B

1st Edition - January 1, 1970

Editor: Sydney Leach

Language: English
eBook ISBN:
9 7 8 - 0 - 3 2 3 - 1 4 1 1 3 - 0

Physical Principles and Techniques of Protein Chemistry, Part B deals with the theories and application of selected physical methods in protein chemistry evaluation. This book is… Read more

Physical Principles and Techniques of Protein Chemistry Part B

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Physical Principles and Techniques of Protein Chemistry, Part B deals with the theories and application of selected physical methods in protein chemistry evaluation. This book is divided into seven chapters that cover the ultracentrifugal analysis, light scattering, infrared (IR) methods, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and differential thermal analysis of protein properties. This text first describes the fundamental ideas and methodology of sedimentation analysis of ideal noninteracting solutes and the problems of nonideality and solute-solute interaction. This book then deals with the problems involved in the interpretation of viscometric data for evaluation of intrinsic viscosity of proteins. The following chapters examine the principles, measurement and analysis of spectra, and experimental techniques of light scattering, IR, and NMR spectroscopic methods. Discussions on coordination phenomena, identification of binding sites, and ion binding in the crystalline state and in protein solutions are included. The concluding chapter presents some examples of protein analysis using differential thermal analysis technique. This book is of great value to chemists, biologists, and researchers who have great appreciation of protein chemistry.