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Nanotoxicity

Prevention and Antibacterial Applications of Nanomaterials

  • 1st Edition - April 8, 2020
  • Editors: Susai Rajendran, Anita Mukherjee, Chandraiah Godugu, Ritesh K. Shukla, Tuan Anh Nguyen
  • Language: English
  • Paperback ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 0 - 1 2 - 8 1 9 9 4 3 - 5
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 0 - 1 2 - 8 1 9 9 4 4 - 2

Nanotoxicity: Prevention, and Antibacterial Applications of Nanomaterials focuses on the fundamental concepts for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nanomaterials. It sheds more ligh… Read more

Nanotoxicity

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Nanotoxicity: Prevention, and Antibacterial Applications of Nanomaterials focuses on the fundamental concepts for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nanomaterials. It sheds more light on the underlying phenomena and fundamental mechanisms through which nanomaterials interact with organisms and physiological media. The book provides good guidance for toxic prevention methods and management in the manufacture/application/disposal. The book also discusses the potential applications of nanomaterials-based antibiotics.

The potential toxic effects of nanomaterials result not only from the type of base materials, but also from their size/ ligands/surface chemical modifications. This book discusses why different classes of nanomaterials display toxic properties, and what can be done to mitigate this toxicity. It also explores how nanomaterials are being used as antimicrobial agents, being used to purify air and water, and counteract a range of infectious diseases.

This is an important reference for materials scientists, environmental scientists and biomedical scientists, who are seeking to gain a greater understanding of how nanomaterials can be used to combat toxic agents, and how the toxicity of nanomaterials themselves can best be mitigated.