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Molecular Mechanisms in the Control of Gene Expression

  • 1st Edition - January 1, 1976
  • Editors: Donald P. Nierlich, W.J. Rutter, C. Fred Fox
  • Language: English
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 2 - 7 3 9 3 - 8

Molecular Mechanisms in the Control of Gene Expression documents the proceedings of the ICN-UCLA conference on Molecular Mechanisms in the Control of Gene Expression, organized… Read more

Molecular Mechanisms in the Control of Gene Expression

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Molecular Mechanisms in the Control of Gene Expression documents the proceedings of the ICN-UCLA conference on Molecular Mechanisms in the Control of Gene Expression, organized through the Molecular Biology Institute of UCLA, held in Keystone, Colorado, 21-26 March 1976. The conference focused on three topics: the action of repressors on specific nucleotide sequences in DNA; how DNA and histones are intertwined in eucaryotic chromosomes; and in the development of new techniques that appear to lift genes from complex genomes. The volume contains 65 chapters organized into nine parts. The papers in Part I examine the organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic chromosomes. Part II presents studies on the interaction of RNA a polymerase and regulatory molecules with defined DNA sites. Parts III and IV focus on RNA polymerases of eukaryotes and the regulation of transcription in eukaryotic systems, respectively. Part V contains papers dealing with nucleic acid sequences, transcription, and processing. Part VI covers cellular aspects in the study of gene expression. Part VII takes up cloning while Part VIII is devoted to genetic analysis through restriction mapping and molecular cloning. Finally, Part IX summarizes the recent progress reported at the conference and also indicates some of the limitations that can be placed upon interpretation of data.