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Comparative Regional Systems

West and East Europe, North America, the Middle East, and Developing Countries

  • 1st Edition - January 1, 1980
  • Editors: Werner J. Feld, Gavin Boyd
  • Language: English
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 1 - 4 8 1 5 - 1

Comparative Regional Systems: West and East Europe, North America, the Middle East, and Developing Countries is a comparative study of regional systems, namely, West and East Euro… Read more

Comparative Regional Systems

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Comparative Regional Systems: West and East Europe, North America, the Middle East, and Developing Countries is a comparative study of regional systems, namely, West and East Europe, North America, the Middle East, and developing countries. This book examines the patterned and unpatterned forms of international activity through which states relate to the most important entities in world politics: their neighbors. The cooperative and conflictual behavior in international politics occurring within regional contexts is discussed, with emphasis on the sources and forms of this behavior as well as the issues that contribute to it and those that it creates.

This monograph is comprised of 15 chapters and opens with an analysis of clusters of variables that form linked patterns within each international region, paying particular attention to the developmental issues that appear to be posed in the various regions of world politics. The following chapters focus on social-psychological factors in regional politics; regional patterns of economic cooperation; political change in regional systems; patterns of transregional relations; and interactions between regional organizations in various parts of the world and the global system that may affect either the operation of the latter or influence actions and functions of the former. The final chapter examines the problems and pitfalls of regional integration theories, along with their inability to "scientifically" predict the pathways of regional development.

This text is designed to assist students, professionals, and the general public interested in international relations.