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Interpretation of Mass Spectra of Organic Compounds

1st Edition - January 1, 1972

Editor: Mynard Hamming

Language: English
eBook ISBN:
9 7 8 - 0 - 3 2 3 - 1 4 3 1 4 - 1

Interpretation of Mass Spectra of Organic Compounds outlines the basic instrumentation, sample handling techniques, and procedures used in the interpretation of mass spectra of… Read more

Interpretation of Mass Spectra of Organic Compounds

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Interpretation of Mass Spectra of Organic Compounds outlines the basic instrumentation, sample handling techniques, and procedures used in the interpretation of mass spectra of organic compounds. The fundamental concepts of ionization, fragmentation, and rearrangement of ions as found in mass spectra are covered in some detail, along with the rectangular array and interpretation maps. Computerization of mass spectral data is also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins with a historical overview of mass spectrometry and a discussion on some important developments in the field, along with a summary of interpretation objectives and methods. The following chapters focus on instruments, ion sources, and detectors; recording of the mass spectrum and the instrumental and sample variables affecting the mass spectrum; sample introduction systems; and fragmentation reactions. Correlations as applied to interpretations are also considered, with emphasis on applications of the branching rule as well as beta-bond and alpha-bond cleavages. Example interpretations, calculations, data-processing procedures, and computer programs are included. This monograph is intended for organic chemists, biochemists, mass spectroscopists, technicians, managers, and others concerned with the whys and wherefores of mass spectrometry.