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Diseases of the Skin

  • 2nd Edition - September 24, 2013
  • Author: James H. Sequeira
  • Language: English
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 1 - 9 5 6 8 - 1

Diseases of the Skin, Second Edition discusses dermatology — the diagnosis and treatment procedure on various skin conditions. The author reviews the histology and morphology of… Read more

Diseases of the Skin

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Diseases of the Skin, Second Edition discusses dermatology — the diagnosis and treatment procedure on various skin conditions. The author reviews the histology and morphology of the skin. He explains congenital affections of the skin such as ichthyosis, xerodermia, albinism, Mongolian blue spots, and of the hair such as adenoma sebaceum. Some irritation is normal for the skin; certain slight anomalies render the skin vulnerable. Some physical and chemical irritants can excite an otherwise normal skin. These irritations are known as erythema, wheals, blisters, intertrigo (chaffing), erythema ab igne (due to heat), solar erythema (sunburn), freckles, and dermatitis medicamentosa. The author also describes micro-biotic affections of the skin such as erysipelas, follicular impetigo, boils, carbuncles, and veld sore. Some substances that can cause skin eruptions are antipyrin, arsenic, boric acid, luminal, mercury, Midol, pantopon, salicylic acid, and tar. Toxics in the blood also cause skin eruptions. These toxics can be from the internal administration of certain drugs, vaccination, from poison of acute rheumatism, septic conditions, and absorption of toxic substances produced by visceral disease. This book is suitable for dermatologists, practitioners of general medicine, students and academicians dealing with the medical sciences, particularly on the skin.