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An Introduction to the Statistical Theory of Classical Simple Dense Fluids

  • 1st Edition - January 1, 1967
  • Author: G.H.A. Cole
  • Language: English
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 2 - 1 4 5 9 - 7

An Introduction to the Statistical Theory of Classical Simple Dense Fluids covers certain aspects of the study of dense fluids, based on the analysis of the correlation effects… Read more

An Introduction to the Statistical Theory of Classical Simple Dense Fluids

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An Introduction to the Statistical Theory of Classical Simple Dense Fluids covers certain aspects of the study of dense fluids, based on the analysis of the correlation effects between representative small groupings of molecules. The book starts by discussing empirical considerations including the physical characteristics of fluids; measured molecular spatial distribution; scattering by a continuous medium; the radial distribution function; the mean potential; and the molecular motion in liquids. The text describes the application of the theories to the description of dense fluids (i.e. interparticle force, classical particle trajectories, and the Liouville Theorem) and the deduction of expressions for the fluid thermodynamic functions. The theory of equilibrium short-range order by using the concept of closure approximation or total correlation; some numerical consequences of the equilibrium theory; and irreversibility are also looked into. The book further tackles the kinetic derivation of the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) equation; the statistical derivation of the MB equation; the movement to equilibrium; gas in a steady state; and viscosity and thermal conductivity. The text also discusses non-equilibrium liquids. Physicists, chemists, and engineers will find the book invaluable.