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Amino Acids, Proteins and Cancer Biochemistry

  • 1st Edition - January 1, 1960
  • Author: Jesse P. Greenstein
  • Editor: John T. Edsall
  • Language: English
  • eBook ISBN:
    9 7 8 - 1 - 4 8 3 2 - 7 0 5 3 - 1

Amino Acids, Proteins, and Cancer Biochemistry focuses on the contributions of Jesse P. Greenstein to biological chemistry, including kinetics, protein mixtures, metabolism,… Read more

Amino Acids, Proteins and Cancer Biochemistry

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Amino Acids, Proteins, and Cancer Biochemistry focuses on the contributions of Jesse P. Greenstein to biological chemistry, including kinetics, protein mixtures, metabolism, tumors, and biosynthesis. The selection first offers information on quantitative nutritional and in vivo metabolic studies with water-soluble, chemically defined diets and internal hydrogen bonding in ribonuclease. Discussions focus on the effects of deuterium on transition temperature, kinetics of deuterium-hydrogen exchange, applications of chemically denned diets, formulation of water-soluble, chemically defined diets, and large-scale preparation of optically pure amino acids. The manuscript then examines the chromatographic evaluation of protein mixtures and observations on the activation of amino acids and biosynthesis of peptide bonds, including synthesis of phenylacetylglutamine and benzoylglycine, studies on amino acyl adenylates, and synthesis of glutamine. The publication ponders on free amino acids and related substances in normal and neoplastic tissues; nucleic acids of normal tissues and tumors; and carbohydrate metabolism in ascites tumor and HeLa cells. Topics include carbohydrate metabolism of ascites tumor cells, comparative biochemistry of glycolysis, DNA and the genetic concept of cancer, and constancy of free amino acid patterns of tissues. The selection is a valuable source of data for biochemists and researchers interested in amino acids, proteins, and cancer biochemistry.